100th Photovoltaic System Goes Online in Riverside

September 17, 2009 at 12:23 am

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – One of the reasons Donna Dacier choose to live in Riverside more than a decade ago was what has drawn people to Southern California for generations.

“I love the sun,” she said.

So installing a photovoltaic system for her home seemed like a natural fit, she said.  When she found out about Riverside Public Utilities’ (RPU) rebate and federal tax incentives, that move made economic sense as well.

“It’s a $47,000 system,” Dacier said.  “By the time you account for the tax incentives and rebates, it’s only costing me $25,000.  That’s a bargain.  And it’s perfect for my ‘60s-style roof.  It’s at an angle perfect for solar panels.”

It was pure chance, she said, that her home on Yellowstone Drive was the 100th photovoltaic solar installation in the city.

“It’s kind of exciting,” she said.  “I was just trying to do my part and use less energy. But at the same time, I still wanted to use my appliances that make life comfortable.”

She confessed that watching the meter slow to a crawl or even move backwards to send power back to the city’s grid from her 4.15-kilowatt system doesn’t hurt either.

“I love to watch my meter.  It’s becoming my favorite channel,” she said.  “My next project is to place solar panels on the roof of the garage to heat the pool.”

The Dacier household joins 99 other city commercial buildings and private residents who have installed photovoltaic solar systems, such as California Baptist University, Casa Blanca Library and the Janet Goeske Center.  The city systems are producing more than 1.3 megawatts of energy.

Chair of the city’s Utility Services Land Use Energy Development Committee, Ward 3 Councilmember Rusty Bailey, said Dacier, who lives in his ward, is indicative of a city that is not satisfied to let things remain status quo in energy consumption.

“Our goal is to be the leader in sustainable living,” he said.  “She and the other 99 residents are living proof of that commitment.”

The milestone is just in time for the Sept. 22 city council meeting, which will feature an update on the city’s efforts promoting the groundbreaking Emerald City project, a Department of Conservation designation that spearheads state conservation and sustainability goals.

“It’s all coming together,” said Mike Bacich, the city’s sustainability officer.  “The 100th PV system in the city shows why we were the state’s first Emerald City.  It all adds up for a cleaner and greener Riverside.”
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – One of the reasons Donna Dacier choose to live in Riverside more than a decade ago was what has drawn people to Southern California for generations.

“I love the sun,” she said.

So installing a photovoltaic system for her home seemed like a natural fit, she said.  When she found out about Riverside Public Utilities’ (RPU) rebate and federal tax incentives, that move made economic sense as well.

“It’s a $47,000 system,” Dacier said.  “By the time you account for the tax incentives and rebates, it’s only costing me $25,000.  That’s a bargain.  And it’s perfect for my ‘60s-style roof.  It’s at an angle perfect for solar panels.”

It was pure chance, she said, that her home on Yellowstone Drive was the 100th photovoltaic solar installation in the city.

“It’s kind of exciting,” she said.  “I was just trying to do my part and use less energy. But at the same time, I still wanted to use my appliances that make life comfortable.”

She confessed that watching the meter slow to a crawl or even move backwards to send power back to the city’s grid from her 4.15-kilowatt system doesn’t hurt either.

“I love to watch my meter.  It’s becoming my favorite channel,” she said.  “My next project is to place solar panels on the roof of the garage to heat the pool.”

The Dacier household joins 99 other city commercial buildings and private residents who have installed photovoltaic solar systems, such as California Baptist University, Casa Blanca Library and the Janet Goeske Center.  The city systems are producing a more than 1.3 megawatts of energy.

Chair of the city’s Utility Services Land Use Energy Development Committee, Ward 3 Councilmember Rusty Bailey, said Dacier, who lives in his ward, is indicative of a city that is not satisfied to let things remain status quo in energy consumption.

“Our goal is to be the leader in sustainable living,” he said.  “She and the other 99 residents are living proof of that commitment.”

The milestone is just in time for the Sept. 22 city council meeting, which will feature an update on the city’s efforts promoting the groundbreaking Emerald City project, a Department of Conservation designation that spearheads state conservation and sustainability goals.

“It’s all coming together,” said Mike Bacich, the city’s sustainability officer.  “The 100th PV system in the city shows why we were the state’s first Emerald City.  It all adds up for a cleaner and greener Riverside.”
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – One of the reasons Donna Dacier choose to live in Riverside more than a decade ago was what has drawn people to Southern California for generations.

“I love the sun,” she said.

So installing a photovoltaic system for her home seemed like a natural fit, she said.  When she found out about Riverside Public Utilities’ (RPU) rebate and federal tax incentives, that move made economic sense as well.

“It’s a $47,000 system,” Dacier said.  “By the time you account for the tax incentives and rebates, it’s only costing me $25,000.  That’s a bargain.  And it’s perfect for my ‘60s-style roof.  It’s at an angle perfect for solar panels.”

It was pure chance, she said, that her home on Yellowstone Drive was the 100th photovoltaic solar installation in the city.

“It’s kind of exciting,” she said.  “I was just trying to do my part and use less energy. But at the same time, I still wanted to use my appliances that make life comfortable.”

She confessed that watching the meter slow to a crawl or even move backwards to send power back to the city’s grid from her 4.15-kilowatt system doesn’t hurt either.

“I love to watch my meter.  It’s becoming my favorite channel,” she said.  “My next project is to place solar panels on the roof of the garage to heat the pool.”

The Dacier household joins 99 other city commercial buildings and private residents who have installed photovoltaic solar systems, such as California Baptist University, Casa Blanca Library and the Janet Goeske Center.  The city systems are producing a more than 1.3 megawatts of energy.

Chair of the city’s Utility Services Land Use Energy Development Committee, Ward 3 Councilmember Rusty Bailey, said Dacier, who lives in his ward, is indicative of a city that is not satisfied to let things remain status quo in energy consumption.

“Our goal is to be the leader in sustainable living,” he said.  “She and the other 99 residents are living proof of that commitment.”

The milestone is just in time for the Sept. 22 city council meeting, which will feature an update on the city’s efforts promoting the groundbreaking Emerald City project, a Department of Conservation designation that spearheads state conservation and sustainability goals.

“It’s all coming together,” said Mike Bacich, the city’s sustainability officer.  “The 100th PV system in the city shows why we were the state’s first Emerald City.  It all adds up for a cleaner and greener Riverside.”
RIVERSIDE, Calif. – One of the reasons Donna Dacier choose to live in Riverside more than a decade ago was what has drawn people to Southern California for generations.

“I love the sun,” she said.

So installing a photovoltaic system for her home seemed like a natural fit, she said.  When she found out about Riverside Public Utilities’ (RPU) rebate and federal tax incentives, that move made economic sense as well.

“It’s a $47,000 system,” Dacier said.  “By the time you account for the tax incentives and rebates, it’s only costing me $25,000.  That’s a bargain.  And it’s perfect for my ‘60s-style roof.  It’s at an angle perfect for solar panels.”

It was pure chance, she said, that her home on Yellowstone Drive was the 100th photovoltaic solar installation in the city.

“It’s kind of exciting,” she said.  “I was just trying to do my part and use less energy. But at the same time, I still wanted to use my appliances that make life comfortable.”

She confessed that watching the meter slow to a crawl or even move backwards to send power back to the city’s grid from her 4.15-kilowatt system doesn’t hurt either.

“I love to watch my meter.  It’s becoming my favorite channel,” she said.  “My next project is to place solar panels on the roof of the garage to heat the pool.”

The Dacier household joins 99 other city commercial buildings and private residents who have installed photovoltaic solar systems, such as California Baptist University, Casa Blanca Library and the Janet Goeske Center.  The city systems are producing a more than 1.3 megawatts of energy.

Chair of the city’s Utility Services Land Use Energy Development Committee, Ward 3 Councilmember Rusty Bailey, said Dacier, who lives in his ward, is indicative of a city that is not satisfied to let things remain status quo in energy consumption.

“Our goal is to be the leader in sustainable living,” he said.  “She and the other 99 residents are living proof of that commitment.”

The milestone is just in time for the Sept. 22 city council meeting, which will feature an update on the city’s efforts promoting the groundbreaking Emerald City project, a Department of Conservation designation that spearheads state conservation and sustainability goals.

“It’s all coming together,” said Mike Bacich, the city’s sustainability officer.  “The 100th PV system in the city shows why we were the state’s first Emerald City.  It all adds up for a cleaner and greener Riverside.”

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Entry filed under: Green Riverside News, Latest Utilities News.

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